The state of (my) existence

I have been living what can be considered an existential crisis for the last five years or so. I have been relinquishing a lot of old ideas and beliefs that I held in my younger life. The introduction of the practice of mindfulness , and the idea of emptying my mind has been a new way of being.

No longer do I strive for happiness , for it always brings disappointments, since it depends on the ever changing circumstances. I have come to accept and live the here and now more . Although moments of irritation triggered by everyday worries and daily demands have not been absent, I have also been encouraging myself to look at the bigger picture .

The idea of a higher being is now more mystical and obscure, since I have adopted a more liberal path in finding meaning in this existence. I’m no longer bound by the traditional concepts of today’s western religions. I have expanded my views and decided to be more inclusive regarding alternative world views and live in the present moment.

Minimalism has also been my latest inspiration. I have recognized that less is truly more. That having more leads to wanting more. It has been also my latest motto in this existence, since abundance and prosperity have proven to be unfulfilling and meaningless .

Simplicity has also been my companion in the midst of the chaos. Perceiving this existence simply has motivated me to live fully and in peace. Letting go of vanity and useless desires has truly freed me from unnecessary addictions . I have come to conclude that living a simple life is much more fulfilling than always seeking for complicated reasons for living.

I have also questioned the existence of the “self” and the real nature of time. Perhaps I am one many cells that compose one larger organism. And time may just be a fabricated idea in our minds.

This state of “my” existence has been a new adventure and a blessing at the same time. It shall continue to be my newest journey .

Thanks for reading .


Ten Reasons why Life could actually be Meaningless

1. Nobody knows with absolute certainty the purpose of this existence.

2. Most people create their own meaning based on individual, cultural experience, with no clear evidence on an objective , collective purpose .

3. We are just beginning to understand the origins of human nature and our place in this vast universe.

4. Nature does not always follow a consistent and organized pattern. It is often chaotic.

5. Nature does not depend and does not seem to care about human condition.

6. We are all going to die, regardless of how much we accomplish and learn in life (and how much we try to ignore and deny it).

7. Nobody knows with certainty what happens to consciousness or the “soul” after we die.

8. Innocent people , children and adult , continue to randomly suffer and die out of starvation, natural disasters, and human caused wars . Do they deserve to die or is it simply chance?

9. The earth is billions of years old, and human race has existed only during a miniature fracture in this planet’s lifetime .

10. All organized religions that are based on the belief of a deity (s) claim to be the only right path to the true purpose of our existence . Who knows which one is right ?

There you have it. I could be wrong and completely out of touch with what is truly the purpose of this life , but this has been my experience so far .

Any thoughts?

We can do better 

We humans constantly deceive ourselves with false ideas.  We trap ourselves with fabricated concepts about who we are and what we are supposed to be.  This existence we call “Life” is a great mystery that few of us consider exploring further than what our five senses allow us to .  

We complain of feeling depressed.  That’s simply our habit of focusing too much on the past that we regret. It is also our selfish way of thinking only about our perceived mysery which is masked by hopelessness.  We are basically trapped in our own living hell, refusing to look beyond ourselves. 

We miss the big picture . 

We complain of feeling anxious and nervous. That’s simply our habit of focusing  too much on an unfavorable  future which will never happen.  It is also our selfish way of thinking about our own perceived  vulnerability and limitations which is masked by helplessness and fear. It paralyzes us, so we make ourselves stagnated in our own ruminating thoughts.  We are basically trapped in our own living hell , refusing to look beyond ourselves. 

We miss the big picture. 

So we tend to create our own addictions to temporarily and superficially cope with the mysery. We become slaves of technology, slaves of substances , slaves of unhealthy relationships .  We fill our minds with more junk that come from the media, religion, and politics.  We dig a hole in the ground and stick our heads pretending we are okay when in reality we are drowning in our own created hell. 

We miss the big picture . 

But we have a choice. 

We can look beyond ourselves and start looking at the bigger picture.  We can start by accepting our mortality and be ok with it.  We can consider the fact that we are not alone in this existence and start helping each other instead . We can escape from our own selfish mysery. 

Donate . Volunteer .  Visit.  Assist.  Serve. 

Reach out to others in need and we will automatically be helping ourselves.  Like living cells that help each other to maintain the organism alive.  Our planet is the organism. 

When death comes, let’s mourn together. When hunger and disaster strike us, let’s assist each other . When blessings come, let’s celebrate together.  Let us embrace our humanness, including our  limitations along with our strengths. 

Not in our own selfish, individual mysery.  But collectively and selflessly in cooperation.  

Let us embrace our fellow human beings. 

Obsolete thinking

We are living in times when there is still communities and organizations that adopt a way of thinking that should be obsolete by now. Thinking and believing that one particular race is superior to others is simply ignorant and immature. 

These are individuals who cannot accept the fact that their way of thinking is already obsolete. Cannot accept the fact that we are finally realizing that we are one community under the description of simply “being human.”

We have been growing and becoming one community.  Those who resist and practice hatred continue to choose to live in their own premature and underdeveloped frame of mind.  They identify with the old way of thinking that is based on segregation , division, and discrimination.  It is simply a lazy way of describing our society.  It is trying to feel better about themselves by putting others down . Practicing hatred and discriminating is another way of bullying. 

Choosing to perceive one’s race , ethnicity , culture, and belief system as superior to others says a lot about our own insecurities.  It says that we are afraid. It says that there is something we don’t like about ourselves without admitting it .  It says that I cannot look at my own faults and shortcomings , so I’m going to focus on others instead who seem different than me and then attack them.  It is basically based on fear. 

But we can do better. We can live our lives, not based on fear, but based on acceptance and love.  We can live our lives accepting each other as mere human beings and learning to live as one community.  We can still do this and celebrate diversity.  A rainbow would not be a rainbow without its different colors .  A forest would not be a forest without its various kinds of plants, animals, and trees. Our bodies would not be a complete body without its different parts performing their own functions and still work harmoniously together . 

Let us unapologetically expose  the hatred , and then replace  it with acceptance and love . 

Feeling Bad

I have been feeling bad lately.  Let me explain.

I work as a supervisor in a mental health program.   I manage other clinicians, nurses, and psychiatrist who serve people with severe mental illness.  It is a stressful job by itself and involves a lot of therapy, case management, medical follow up, consultation, traveling, etc.  It is a job that not anybody can withstand or even consider taking, because it is not a typical mental health facility.   The program is based on the PACT model (Programs of Assertive Community Treatment) and it involves intensive psychiatric and rehabilitation services , similar to what clients receive in psychiatric hospitals, but in the community.  So you can imagine the amount or work and tension that we often experience in trying to help individuals with paranoia, delusions, disorganized thinking, and poor social skills remain living in their homes.   Even though I may be describing it as a difficult job, it is very self rewarding.  We are actually helping people stay away from institutions and jails simply because of the severity of their illness.  We are helping them live normal lives like the rest of us.

But I recently started feeling really bad about my job because of the way the company sometimes treats our staff.   They are not usually paid the salary that other facilities and hospitals in the community pay their clinical staff, plus they started hiring more bachelor levels so that the  cost of hiring people would be less.  So the competition has been an uphill battle which results in a high turn over rate.

Since I started working for this PACT program in 2011, we have had two full time doctors, and recently two part times.  The two part time psychiatrists  shared the case load of a total of 101 clients.  The last two psychiatrists were working under a contract  instead of being regular employees.  But unfortunately , one of the two part time doctors decided to move out of the state for a better paying job (its usually  because of the money) and we found ourselves planning to have one part time doctor cover  while starting to recruit for another doctor to take over the other half of the caseload.   The situation became more complicated when the company advertised the position and found a candidate who was willing to work full time instead, as a regular employee.  Having a full time practitioner is what the PACT model is based on primarily and it facilitates the overall function of the program.    So needless to say, the company had to make the difficult decision to “get rid of the part time psychiatrist” so that we can officially hire the new full time practitioner (who happens to be an ARNP who can do the same type of job as a psychiatrist).   Of course, letting the remaining part time psychiatrist know was the hard pill to swallow.  Not to mention informing the clients (once again) that their psychiatrist was resigning and they were going to be seen by a different practitioner.   Our clients who all suffer from a severe and persistent mental illness, are already marked by difficult times in their lives, and change is one of the most difficult experience which can exacerbate their symptoms.

The CEO of the company is the one who negotiates with psychiatrists and makes the final decisions about which psychiatrist to hire.  My supervisor and I interviewed the new candidate and we liked her, but the CEO was the one making the decision about moving  forward with her, meaning that the part time psychiatrist who was still working with us had to go.   Part of me said we were doing the wrong thing… that we should’ve looked for a another part time psychiatrist so that we wouldn’t have to lose the one we already had.  I was informed that the CEO would then speak with the part time psychiatrist about our plans, which I was glad I did not have to do, although I wished we could have done something different so that we can keep the part time psychiatrist.  But that was not my decision to make.

To make matters worse, last week, the part time psychiatrist approached me and asked me about what the company was planning to do with her if they find a full time practitioner.  I was dumbfounded and caught off guard, not knowing what to say at the moment.  I thought that the CEO had spoken with her about his decision already,  but it turned out he had not informed her yet.  So I had to tell her the truth at that moment, I don’t believe in lying or hiding things from people, especially staff people who work with me.   But I also told her that the CEO should be speaking with her about the matter in more details soon.  So, understandably, the part time psychiatrist seemed upset and said she will just resign.

I felt as big as an ant.

Here we are, literally getting rid of a part time person, a human being with a family to feed and a career to keep, so that we can replace her with a full time person who will take her place to “serve our clients.”  The company has a budget to keep, so having one full time psychiatrist was more financially convenient.   I understand the technicality and the business part of the reason why we need to make this decision.  But the human side of the matter sucks.

So I feel bad.  I feel we made a mistake.  I wish I could have done something different and prevent having to get rid of the part time psychiatrist.  I wish the CEO would have contacted the part time psychiatrist early and offer her to stay with maybe less hours, but still stay working with us along with the full time ARNP.

But it is too late now.  She decided to suddenly resign , sooner than what the contract mandates.  I can understand her anger and frustration. I also understand the need to have a full time practitioner who also has more flexibility with traveling and visiting our clients.

So I am split in half, feeling glad that we found a full time practitioner soon;  but still feeling bad that we lost a very good psychiatrist and made her upset in the process.

At the end of the day, the ones suffering the most are our clients, who will have to face another change of providers.  And most likely run the risk of  increasing their symptoms of mental illness because of this transition they are forced to face.

It’s hard being a supervisor sometimes.


Life summarized 

This existence seems to be merely an awareness based on fabricated thoughts and individualized perceptions we call “reality” that dictates most of our behaviors.  This overall existence called “life” is mostly preferred over the notion of “death” because we usually don’t want to acknowledge the inevitable end of this perceived existence.

We choose what we believe, many times without realizing it, and continue our existence as if what we believe is an ultimate truth.   We deceive ourselves with fantasies and illusions that nourish our egos and makes us feel secure and important… but it is all an attempt to distract us from our destiny: death.

We tend to want to belong to some kind of group and community , creating societies, in order to feel secured and protected (trying to recreate the experience inside the womb).   But we often fail to realize and accept the fact that we are simply deceiving ourselves.  Unconsciously afraid of facing the reality of our mortality.

And because of this profound fear, we continue our journey of biased perceptions attempting to maintain a state of awareness we call “happiness”, not realizing that it depends solely on circumstances that we choose to cherish.

This existence is slowly decaying and shutting down.  This awareness will eventually cease to be present and we will  not even know it has happened.  All we can be aware of is what is experienced at the present moment.  Right now.

Think about it.




Dissecting reality


We create our own worlds in our minds… We create images and ideas in our minds, which creates our realities.   .. When we like someone, it is not the person itself but the idea that we have of the person that we like. When we go through some difficult situation, it is the interpretation or the idea of the situation that we dislike. Everything we experience is through our interpretations, our ideas.  So I have learned to break down my ideas and images. So I have started to dissect what we call “reality.”

I see people driving down the road in high speed, and my first instinct reaction is to get mad at them.   But then I ask, why am I choosing to be mad?  What thoughts and perceptions do I have about people driving fast that are triggering the anger?  Then I find no good reason to feel anything, except to be cautious.

Then I have a disagreement with my spouse, and she withdraws.  I also isolate myself in rebellion.   I automatically feel upset and nervous, but then I question the reason why I feel so anxious.  What am I afraid of?   Argument?  Separation?  Being alone?

The next day I may be at work and trying to meet a deadline.  I feel anxious that I may not do the job on time.  Then I stop myself and rethink.  I take a deep breath.  I dispute the reason why I may be feeling anxious.  What is the worst that could happen?  Is there a need to feel this anxious?

I look back at all the things I have learned to take for granted.  I have taken a second look at all the things I thought were simply “normal” and “acceptable”.  And I start questioning them.

Assumptions.  Beliefs.  Customs.  Expectations.  Discriminations.   Family traditions.  Habits.  Ideologies.  Myths.  Obsessions.  Religions.   Social rituals.  Values.  World views.

They all can be taken apart… dissected.   They all can be questioned and dismissed.  We don’t have to adopt any of them if we don’t really want to.

They are all in our minds.

They all can be dissected.